West indian culture

US created over 400 boarding schools to extinguish indigenous culture (media)

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Members of the 23 indigenous pueblos in the U.S. state of New Mexico, along with several tribes in the state of Arizona, celebrate Inaugural Indigenous Peoples Day at the Indian Pueblo Cultural Center in Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA. United States, October 14, 2019 (Photo by Richard Lakin/Xinhua)

Children were forcibly removed from their homes. In 1893, the Bureau of Indian Affairs received congressional authority to withhold food rations and supplies from Native American families who refused to enroll or keep their children in boarding schools.

NEW YORK, Nov. 17 (Xinhua) — Beginning in the early 1800s, the U.S. government established and supported more than 400 boarding schools designed to extinguish native culture and assimilate young Native Americans into white society, NBC News reported Wednesday. .

“The object, in the words of one of the founders of the first school, was to ‘kill the Indian in him and save the man,'” the report states.

Schools often forced children to take English names and abandon their style of dress and hair, as well as their traditional languages, religions and cultural practices, the report notes.

“Children were forcibly removed from their homes. In 1893, the Bureau of Indian Affairs was authorized by Congress to withhold food rations and supplies from Native American families who refused to enroll or keep their children in boarding schools,” he said.

The boarding school system was used as a “weapon” not only to sever children’s ties to their families and culture, but also to grab land from indigenous peoples, according to a US Senate report released in 1969.

At least 100,000 Native American children are estimated to have attended boarding schools, which operated in 37 states, with the last closing in the late 1960s, according to the report.

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