Month: October 2021

Memory celebrates the life of Ritu Nanda

The memoir of Raj Kapoor’s daughter, Ritu Nanda, takes a closer look at her life and the various roles she has played, including that of insurance advisor and creator of the popular Niky Tasha line of kitchenettes. Written by Sathya…

Gordon Ramsay’s social media project culminates in cookbook

How did Gordon Ramsay get through his pandemic containment? Getting frantic in a kitchen, of course. The chef with a dizzying array of books, restaurants and TV shows was at home in Cornwall, England with mouths to feed last year…

Subversions: Essays on Life and Literature: The Tribune India

PADMA SHRI and Sahitya Akademi Fellow, novelist Shashi Deshpande has, for more than four long decades, contributed extensively and richly to public debates on the role of the writer and writing in India, and on various social, literary and contemporary…

What it is, why should you care, and where to start

This content contains affiliate links. When you purchase through these links, we may earn an affiliate commission. India’s long struggle for independence from the British Raj, which began with the Indian Mutiny of 1857, gained momentum after World War II….

New book to tell origin stories from Indian states

A new book, slated for release on October 25, will feature the incredible origin stories of each of India’s 28 states and eight union territories. “The Origin Story of States of India”, published by Penguin Random House India (PRHI), is…

Novelist Antje Ravik Strubel wins German Book Prize

Currently, in the literary world, everything seems to revolve around the past: its weight, how we can come to terms with it, learn from it, worry about it or overcome it. In Britain, for example, the historical novel has enjoyed…

Sunday Reading: Reviews of Classical Literature

In 1981, British critic VS Pritchett published a review of Salman Rushdie’s second novel, “The Midnight Childrena political satire about a boy born in India as the country moves from colonial rule to independence. Rushdie eludes the feints typical of…